Heisey Shaker

Patent No. 1,966,611
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With an overview of the Heisey Glass Co. written by Stephen Visakay
Patented July 17, 19341,966,611

United States Patent Office

1,966,611

SHAKER

Ray C. Cobel, Newark, Ohio, assignor to A. H. Heisey & Company, Newark, Ohio, a partnership

Application December 19, 1931, Serial No. 582,112
Renewed May 31, 1934
6 Claims. (Cl. 259—72)

My invention relates to shakers. It has to do, more particularly, with a device which is commonly known as a cocktail shaker. It relates more specifically to a device which is used for mixing various drinks.

In the prior art, shakers of the type indicated have usually been made entirely of metal. However, some of them have been made of glass or other material but these usually have been provided with metal tops or tops made of some other material having various undesirable qualities. Most of the tops used on shakers of the type indicated consist of cork or metal or of both materials. Such tops have been found to be unsuitable for use. One of the most undesirable features of such tops is the fact that they are unsanitary. The cork tends to rot and is also very hard to keep clean. The metal of the top tends to corrode and also becomes very unsanitary. Furthermore, in such tops it is almost Impossible to get a tight fit between the top and the container In order to prevent leakage of the liquid therefrom.

Furthermore, many of the shakers of the type indicated have not been provided with strainers to prevent the escape of the large particles of fruit or other substances, when the liquid is poured from the container. In some Instances, strainers have been provided in these shakers, but such strainers usually have been made of metal which tends to corrode and to thereby stop up the openings through which the liquid passes when being poured from the container. Furthermore, such prior art devices have been constructed in such a manner that all the parts are not readily accessible for cleaning.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a shaker of the type Indicated which will be very sanitary and which will have all of its parts readily accessible for cleaning.

Another object of my Invention is to provide a shaker of the type indicated which will have all of its parts made of some material such as glass, which will not corrode, rot or deteriorate in any manner.

Another object of my invention is to provide a shaker of the type Indicated which will have a closure for the top of the container, of such a type as to prevent any leakage therefrom.

Another object of my invention is to provide a shaker of the type Indicated having a strainer adapted to be mounted in the upper end of the container.

In Its preferred form, my invention contemplates the provision of a shaker of the type indicated which comprises a container or body portion made in any desirable shape or of any material desired, but preferably of glass. This container is provided with a neck in which is adapted to be mounted a member having a strainer formed in its lower end and a pouring lip formed on its upper end. This member is made of some material which will not rot, corrode or deteriorate, and this member will fit into the upper end of the container in such a manner that there will be no leakage between it and the container. The upper end of this member is provided with a seat which is adapted to receive a stopper of the same material, which is so fitted therein as to prevent leakage.

The preferred embodiment of my Invention is shown In the accompanying drawing wherein similar characters of reference designate corresponding parts, and wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a shaker made In accordance with my Invention.

Figure 2 is a section of the upper part of the shaker.

Figure 3 is a view showing the various parts before being assembled, the strainer member being partly cut away.

With reference to the drawing, the shaker comprises a container 1 which may be made of any suitable shape but is shown as being of substantially cylindrical form. This container is preferably made of some material which will not readily conduct heat or cold. Glass has been found most suitable for this purpose. A neck 2 is formed on the upper end of this container and this neck is provided with an outwardly extending flange 3 formed on Its upper end. This flange acts as a means for strengthening the neck and also provides a place where the container may be easily gripped by the hand and held therein.

The Inner wall of the neck 2 is downwardly and Inwardly Inclined, as shown in Figure 2. This inner wall is preferably ground by means of emery or other substances for a purpose to be hereinafter explained.

A strainer member 4 is adapted to be mounted in the neck 2. This strainer member is preferably made of glass or some other material which will not deteriorate in any way. This strainer member is hollow and the lower portion of its outer wall is ground away so as to be Inclined downwardly and inwardly. The outer surface of the lower portion of the member 4 and the inner surface of the neck 2 are preferably ground in the well-known manner by means of emery and, at the same time, so that there will be a tight fit between the member 4 and the inner surface of the neck 2.

A bottom 5 is provided in the strainer member 4 and this bottom is provided with a series of openings 6 extending therethrough. Any number of these openings may be provided and they may be of any size or shape desired. The strainer member 4 is further provided, adjacent its upper end, with an outwardly projecting flange 7. This flange is adapted to strengthen the upper end of the strainer member 4 and also serve as a means for holding the strainer member 4 in place during the shaking operation and when the liquid is poured from the container 1.

The upper end of the strainer member 4 is also provided with a pouring lip 8 which is formed integrally therewith. This lip is preferably of a shape shown in the drawing, but its shape may be varied.

A stopper 9 is also adapted to be mounted in the upper end of the strainer member 4. This stopper member is also preferably made of glass. The lower portion of this stopper is adapted to seat into a socket formed in the upper end of the member 4. The seat for the stopper is slightly inclined and is ground in the member 4. The lower portion of the stopper is ground to fit tightly into the seat.

When it is desired to mix a drink, the ingredients are placed in the container 1. Then the strainer member 4 is placed in the upper end of the container. The stopper 9 is then inserted into the upper end of the member 4. The drink may then be shaken vigorously, it being understood that the stopper and strainer members are held in place by the hand. When the drink has been thoroughly mixed, the stopper 9 is removed, and the drink is poured from the container. The pouring lip 8 will aid in this pouring operation. It will be understood that the liquid will pass through the openings 6 in the bottom of the strainer member, but that the large particles of fruit, ice, or other ingredients will not pass therethrough.

As previously stated, all the parts of my shaker are preferably made of glass. By making the container of glass, it will be much easier to hold it in the hands, inasmuch as glass is not a good conductor and will not become excessively cold. Furthermore, by having all the parts made of glass, there will be no corrosion, rotting or other forms of deterioration of these various parts. It will also be seen that such a device is extremely sanitary and that all the parts may be easily cleaned. It will also be understood that the various parts are so constructed that they will fit together without leakage.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A strainer made of glass comprising a hollow body portion, a pouring lip formed on the upper end of said hollow body portion, a flange formed on the outer surface of said body portion adjacent its upper end and adapted to strengthen said body portion, a bottom on said body portion and formed integrally therewith, said bottom being provided with a series of apertures, a seat ground into the upper end of said body portion, and a glass stropper [sic.] adapted to be inserted into the upper end of said body portion, said stopper having a ground surface adapted to cooperate with the ground seat formed in said body portion to secure a tight fit between said body portion and said stopper.

2. A shaker for mixing drinks or the like, having all of its parts made of glass, comprising a container, a neck formed on the upper end of said container, a strainer member mounted in said neck, said strainer member comprising a hollow body portion, a pouring lip formed integrally on the upper end of said hollow body portion, a flange formed on the outer surface of said body portion adjacent its upper end and adapted to strengthen said body portion, a bottom on said body portion and formed integrally therewith, said bottom being provided with a series of apertures, a seat ground into the upper end of said body portion of said strainer and adapted to receive a stopper which is inserted therein and which has a correspondingly ground surface, said neck of said container being also provided with a ground surface adapted to cooperate with a correspondingly ground surface on the lower end of said strainer member.

3. A shaker for mixing drinks or the like, having all of its parts made of glass, comprising a container, a neck formed on the upper end of said container, said neck having a flange formed adjacent the upper end thereof, a strainer member adapted to be mounted in said neck and having a portion adapted to extend thereinto, and tightly fit therewithin, said strainer member comprising a hollow body portion, a flange formed on the outer surface of said body portion adjacent ts upper end and adapted to strengthen said body portion, a pouring lip formed integrally on the upper end of said hollow body portion directly above said flange, a transversely disposed wall member in said hollow body portion and formed integrally therewith, said wall member being provided with a series of apertures, and a glass stopper adapted to extend into the upper end of said hollow body portion and. tightly fit therewithin.

4. A shaker for mixing drinks or the like, having all of its parts made of glass, comprising a container, a neck formed on the upper end of said container, said neck having a flange formed adjacent the upper end thereof, a strainer member mounted in said neck and having a portion adapted to extend thereinto and to tightly fit therewithin, said strainer member comprising a hollow body portion, a flange formed on the outer surface of said body portion adjacent Its upper end and adapted to strengthen said body portion, a pouring lip formed integrally on the upper end of said hollow body portion directly above said flange and a transversely disposed wall member adjacent the bottom of said hollow body portion and formed integrally therewith, said wall member being provided with a series of apertures.

5. A shaker for mixing drinks or the like comprising a container having an open end and a strainer adapted to telescopically cooperate with said open end, said strainer being made of glass and comprising a hollow body portion, a pouring lip formed integrally on the upper end of said hollow body portion, a flange integrally formed on the outer surface of said hollow body portion directly below said pouring lip, said flange extending outwardly from said body portion to a point beyond the outermost portion of said pouring lip, a transversely extending wall member adjacent the bottom of said hollow body portion integrally joined to the side walls thereof, said wall member being provided with a series of apertures formed therein.

6. A shaker for mixing drinks or the like comprising a container having an open end and a strainer adapted to telescopically cooperate with said open end, said strainer being made of glass and comprising a hollow body portion, a pouring lip formed integrally on the upper end of said hollow body portion, a flange integrally formed on the outer surface of said hollow body portion directly below said pouring lip, said flange extending outwardly from said body portion to a point beyond the outermost portion of said pouring lip, a transversely extending wall member adjacent the bottom of said hollow body portion integrally joined to the side walls thereof, said wall member being provided with a series of apertures formed therein, and a stopper member adapted to tightly fit within the upper end of said hollow body portion.

RAY C. COBEL

Overview

Heisey Glass Co.
Newark Ohio 1895 – 1957

written by Stephen Visakay

Patent #1,966,611Everyone looked forward to the end of Prohibition. The great glass companies knew it was only a matter of time. They were preparing for the sale of drinking glassware, martini pitchers, decanters and ice buckets.

In December of 1931 Heisey applied for a patent on three piece all glass cocktail shakers which included an innovative glass strainer. They received a patent in July of 1934, long after production had begun.

In December of 1932 Mark Cross of Fifth Avenue, in The New York Times, advertised the three piece glass mixer with eight glasses, just in time for the end of the year holidays, at a price of $22.50.

The real buying binge would begin a year later in December of 1933 when the Twenty-first Amendment, repealing Prohibition, was ratified. Beverage mixers were now, not only advertised as cocktail shakers, but also took on fanciful names such as Happy Days, Have-Another, Good Fellowship and the Repealer.

More on Heisey Glass Co.

Established in 1895 in Newark Ohio, Heisey produced its first line of glassware in April of 1896. In 1900 the company began using its famous trademark, an “H” placed in the center of a diamond. The company’s early designs were relatively plain but brightly colored. In 1907 Heisey released its famous Colonial pattern which remained in production until the companies closing in 1957. Founder A.H. Heisey died in 1922, and his son Wilson Heisey took over the company, expanding the line of colored glass and etched designs.

The Heisey Company continued to be successful. After Prohibition they released an extensive line of barware, including the three piece patented glass cocktail shaker. The sales of the barware line helped the company survive the Great Depression. And sales remained high throughout the war and post war periods.

Heisey began producing glass figurines in 1940. These figurines were designed by Royal Hickman and found immense favor with the buying public. The 1944 Broadway production of Tennessee William’s play, The Glass Menagerie, featured the glass figurines produced by Heisey Glass Co.

In the years following the Second World War, Heisey released the immensely successful Heisey Rose design of glass ware to its already famous Colonial, Orchid and Plantation line. But life in the Atomic Age was changing dramatically, and elegant stemware was becoming less favored by the American public. Stylish dinner parties were giving way to back yard barbeques, and cocktails were mixed at the flick of a switch in electric mixers.

Sales slowed for Heisey and in 1957 they sold all assets and molds to the Imperial Glass Co. of Bellaire OH, closing doors on Christmas Day. Imperial Glass Co. filed for bankruptcy in 1984 and Heisey’s original molds were acquired by the Heisey Collectors of America, located in Newark OH.

For more on Heisey Glass Co
Replacements Ltd.
www.replacementsltd.com
The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Heisey Glass
By Neila M Bredehoft
Collector Books
Heisey Glassware
by S. Dunbar
Krause Publications.
The National Heisey Glass Museum
169 W. Church St. Newark OH 43055
www.heiseymuseum.org
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