Gaiety Cocktail Shaker

Patent #1,969,386
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Patented Aug. 7, 19341,969,386

United States Patent Office

1,969,386

COCKTAIL SHAKER

Howard F. Reichenbach, Waterbury, Conn., assignor to The Chase Companies, Incorporated, Waterbury, Conn., a corporation

Application October 6, 1933, Serial No. 692,361
2 Claims. (Cl. 220—1)

My invention relates to an improvement in cocktail shakers, the object being to produce a shaker of superior convenience, appearance and effectiveness, constructed with particular reference to preventing the escape of any fluid, no matter how violently it is shaken.

With these ends in view, my invention further consists in a cocktail shaker having certain details of construction and combinations of parts as will be hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawing:

Fig. 1 is a broken view, partly in elevation and partly in vertical section, of a cocktail shaker constructed in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a detached view, partly in elevation and partly in vertical section, of the cap thereof;

Fig. 3 is a similar view of the upper portion of the container thereof;

Fig. 4 is a view in transverse section on the line 4—4 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a detached perspective view of the removable strainer, looking at its under face.

In carrying out my invention, as herein shown, I employ a cylindrical container 10 contracted at its upper end to form a tapering top 11 which merges into a slightly-conical neck 12 terminating in a flaring lip 13, the parts named being preferably made integral, though that is not essential. With such a container, I employ a cylindrical cap 14 corresponding to it in diameter and having a relatively-flat top formed with concentric shoulders 15 and 16 and provided with a handle comprising a two-piece sheet-metal grip 17 and a nut 18, into the upper face of which the main part of the grip is inserted and soldered in place. The said nut 18 receives a screw 19 passing upward through the center of the top of the cap 14, to which the handle is thus firmly secured. A slightly-conical, annular, sheet-metal stopper 20 of about half the depth of the cap is located concentrically therein and has its upper edge soldered as at 21 within the shoulder 15 in the top of the cap 14. The taper of the stopper 20 corresponds substantially to the taper of the neck 12 of the container, as shown in Fig. 1, the parts being so proportioned that when the shaker is held by its opposite ends in the hands as in use, the lateral pressure upon its ends will tend to crowd the conical stopper into the flaring neck 12 and effectually seal it. In this connection, it will be noted that a slight clearance 21a is provided for between the lower edge of the cap and a shoulder 22 formed near the upper end of the body of the container. But it is to be understood that when the cap is applied to the container, the stopper 20 fits into the neck 12, so as to seal it and prevent its contents from escaping. The point made above is that the harder the shaking, the tighter the seal. The snug fitting of the lower end of the cap over the upper end of the container as at 23 constitutes an additional safeguard against any escape of fluid from the shaker.

Within the lower end of the neck 12 of the container I locate a fastening-ring 24 soldered or otherwise secured in place and struck-up at spaced intervals to produce locking-bosses 25 which enter inset bayonet-notches 26 formed in the upstanding flange of a shallow cup-like removable strainer 27 having an upstanding faceted handle 28 provided for readily rotating the strainer within the ring 24 sufficiently to engage and disengage its notches 26 with and from the locking-bosses 25.

The flange of the strainer is turned outward to form a lip 29 which, when the strainer is in place, rests upon the upper edge of the ring 24, as shown at 30 in Fig. 1, but this is not essential.

As shown, the lower end of the container is formed with three concentric inwardly-struck bands or fillets 31, while the cap 14 is provided with two of such fillets 31. But these fillets are purely ornamental and may be omitted, though they give the finished shaker a high degree of style in the modern taste for design.

My improved cocktail shaker, as thus shown and described, in addition to being relatively simple in construction and convenient to use, effectively prevents any escape of liquid during the shaking operation, without any particular precautionary measures to that end—in fact, the harder it is shaken, the more effective the sealing action of its cap. The shape given to it by the character of its construction gives it a high degree of attractiveness.

I claim:

1. In a cocktail shaker, the combination with a cylindrical body formed at its upper end with a tapering top merging into a tapering neck extended to form a flaring lip, of a cylindrical cap substantially corresponding in diameter to the diameter of the container, its lower edge fitting snugly over the upper end of the body thereof, a handle for the said cap, a conical sheet-metal stopper secured by its upper edge concentrically within the cap and fitting within the tapering neck of the container, and a removable strainer located within the lower end of the neck of the container.

2. In a cocktail shaker, the combination with a cylindrical body formed at its upper end with a tapering top merging into a tapering neck extended to form a flaring lip, of a cylindrical cap substantially corresponding in diameter to the diameter of the container, its lower edge fitting snugly over the upper end of the body thereof, a handle for the said cap, a conical sheet-metal stopper secured by its upper edge concentrically within the cap and fitting within the tapering neck of the container, a retaining-ring fixed within the lower end of the neck of the container and having locking-bosses, and a removable strainer having an upstanding flange formed with locking-notches for coaction with the said bosses of the retaining-ring and also provided with an upstanding handle.

HOWARD P. BEICHENBACH.

The Chase "Gaiety" Cocktail Shaker

by Stephen Visakay

Chase Brass & Copper Co.
Waterbury Connecticut 1876-1976
By designer Howard F. Reichenbach for Chase.

The Chase “GAIETY” cocktail shaker, one of the most popular Art Deco inspired shakers of the 1930s could be had for the price of $4. The tall chrome-plated cylinder with black bands was the perfect wedding gift. The Chase catalog boasted “Entirely modern in appearance, it retains all the desirable features of old-fashioned shakers.” When put together with cups and tray the set was called the Holiday Cocktail Set and had a selling price of $9.

The Gaiety shaker was only produced the first year with black bands, after that it could be had with either red, green or white bands. These colors today prove harder to find and bring slightly higher prices.

The six-piece Holiday Cocktail Set was featured in The Saturday Evening Post, September 14, 1935 as a premium offered by Kool Cigarettes. All one had to do was smoke a mere 650 packs of cigarettes and save the coupons for this swell little set.

More on Chase

Established in 1876, Chase was the Nations largest supplier, of over 33,000 different items, of brass and copper products such as; rivets, upholstery tacks, buttons, pins, castings, and plumbing supplies, as well as flat, sheet and bar stock.

With the 1929 market crash and subsequent economic decline, Chase made efforts to strike out in new areas with a small gift line to increase sales. They were already producing some brass and copper novelties and chrome-plated household products in the new moderne style. The gift ware line was made immediately successful by the movie-going public, its appetite wetted for chrome by lavish and gleaming Hollywood movie sets in the new Art Deco style.

Contributing to the accomplishments of Chase was their practice of hiring guest star designers to lend their talents to Chase products. Lurelle Guild designed a complete line of lighting fixtures, also serving trays, magazine racks, and fruit baskets. Rockwell Kent designed a cigarette box and wine cooler. Russel Wright designed an ice bucket, salt and peppers, coasters, and turned unused brass bedstead balls into a “Pancake & Corn Set” in which the sphere pitcher held syrup or drawn butter. Walter von Nessen designed many items from stock plumbing supplies such as candlesticks and bookends, and won awards for the design of his 1932 Diplomat Coffee Set, one of the most sought-after Chase items.

The Chase line of household fixtures, smoking items, and lamps were outselling all other companies when the advent of World War II stopped all use of chrome plating for public consumption. All production went toward the war effort. Chase, once again as they had during the First World War, was producing brass cartridge casings.

Chase went overnight from sleek cocktail shakers to artillery shells and when the war ended there was no return. The public had lost interest in chrome-plated house wares. The Chase chrome era, as well as the age of the cocktail had ended. Declining sales and increased foreign competition resulted in the liquidation of the company in 1976.

For more reading on Chase Brass & Copper Company:
The Chase Era. by Donald-Brian Johnson, Schiffler Books 2002
Chase Catalogs 1934 & 1935 Chromium, Brass & Copper Specialties by Leslie Pina Schiffler Books 1998
Art Deco Chrome; The Chase Era. Richard J. Kilbride. Jo-D books 1988
Shown also in:
Art Deco Identification and Price Guide, page 364, by Tony Fusco. Avon Books
Collector’s Guide to Art Deco, page12 by Mary Frank Gaston. Collector Books
Art Deco Chrome. Page78 . by Jim Linz Schiffer Books
Popular Art Deco. Robert Heide and John Gilman, page 66. Abbeville Press
Vintage Bar Ware, Visakay, page 64-71 Collector Books
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